About The Siberian 

Siberian cats are a Russian national treasure. They have been documented in Russia for hundreds of years and are mentioned in Russian fairy tales and children’s books. The breed also appears in Harrison Wier’s book Our Cats and All About Them, published in 1889. Russian families relay fond tales of their Siberians and their amazing loyalty and personalities, but these cats also have played a practical role on farms as rodent control. When the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States ended, the doors opened for the Siberian cat to be exported worldwide. The first Siberians arrived in the United States in June 1990. The Siberian was accepted for registration by CFA in February 2000 and advanced to championship status in February 2006.

 

The Siberian is a medium to large cat with the overall appearance of excellent physical condition, strength, balance, power, and alertness, modified by a sweet facial expression. Their eyes vary in color from gold to green and all shades inbetween. Some have two different colored eyes, and some even have blue eyes. Siberians are a natural breed and reflect the climate in which they developed, with their very dense, medium to long, water repellent triple coat. This coat is accented with a ruff around the neck, full fluffy britches, and a bushy tail, normally carried up with pride but also quite useful to wrap around the face and paws to keep warm. Lynx tipping on the ear is allowed, and full ear furnishings are required. This means that the tops of the ears can have hair, which makes the ears look pointed when in fact they are rounded, and that the inside of the ear has hair that protects it from the elements. This glorious and quite useful fur comes in all colors and combinations, with or without white markings, and tends to remain relatively tangle-free, requiring only occasional brushing. Fortunately, Siberians like to play in water, so if bathed regularly as kittens they may actually enjoy the attention of a bath.

This is a cat designed by nature to survive, with no extremes in type. The Siberian can take up to five years to mature, with females generally being smaller than the males. The general impression of the body is one of circles and roundness, rather than rectangles and triangles.

 

Siberian cats are very personable and want to be near their owners. They enjoy the company of children, dogs, and other animals. They are fearless and easygoing. Not much disturbs their natural calm and equanimity. They seem to know when they are needed for psychological and moral support and spend time with the person who needs that support. They are a quiet breed that expresses itself in a melodic way through sweet mews, trills, chirps, and lots of purring. All types of toys intrigue them. Some learn to play fetch, while others are intrigued by the moving cursor on the computer screen or sit and watch, entranced, as you type. Acrobatic by nature, the Siberian will play hard, often executing amazing somersaults in pursuit of a feather toy. An over enthusiastic kitten may need to be rescued while attempting to climb the bricks on the fireplace or jump to the top of a bookshelf. Siberians stay playful throughout their lives.

-Allergies?-

Siberians have a lesser tendency for producing allergens.  While no pet is non allergenic, the Siberian Cat is a great prospect for homes affected by pet allergies.

 

Contrary to popular belief, allergic reactions from cats are not the result of hair length. The problem, in fact, is caused by a protein known as FEL D-1 that is produced in the sebaceous glands of the cat's saliva. Cats are notorious groomers. After a grooming session, the saliva dries on the cat's fur. The tiny particles become airborne, landing on carpeting, furniture, drapes, etc. Once they come in contact with a human, either on the skin or by inhalation, an allergic reaction can be triggered if that person has a sensitivity to the protein. Symptoms come in many forms. Some people develop a red, itchy rash on their skin. Others have difficulty breathing. However, the more common reactions include sneezing, watery bloodshot eyes, a scratchy throat, and/or an itchy runny nose.

The Siberian cat produces lower levels of FEL D-1 and, therefore, provokes less allergic reactions than do most other cats and can be said to have hypo-allergenic qualities (having a decreased tendency to provoke an allergic reaction).

© Breed Information from CFA.org

- Breed Specific  Details -

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (www.wikipedia.com)

The Siberian is a long haired breed of cat. The Siberian cat breed is recognized by most cat organizations, which accept Siberians of any color (including color points) for competition. This includes recognition in the major cat registries such as TICA and Cat Fanciers' Association (CFA), as well as acceptance in the CFA Championship class beginning on February 6th, 2006.

 

Characteristics

Body

Known to be an exceptionally high jumper, the Siberian is a strong and powerfully built cat, with well proportioned characteristics that include strong hindquarters and large stomachs. They typically weigh between 15-20 pounds (6.8-9.1 kg) for the males, or 10-15 pounds (4.5-6.8 kg) for females. They are shorter and stockier than Maine Coon cats and Norwegian Forest Cats even though they can attain approximately the same weight. Also, Siberians typically attain their full growth more slowly, over their first 5 years.

 

Personality

Siberians are generally intelligent, playful, affectionate and loyal, leading many to describe their character as dog-like.

 

Fur

Siberians may be 90% hypoallergenic. No conclusive information is currently available. Despite the lack of scientific evidence, extensive anecdotal evidence can be found from breeders and pet owners supporting such claims. Siberian fur is textured, medium-long and usually tabby patterned. Their fur is plush, can have a wide range of coloration (including points), and does not have a tendency to mat.

 

Reproduction

On average, a Siberian cat's litter consists of 5 kittens.

 

Ancestry

While Siberians are a fairly recent introduction to the US(1990) and thus relatively rare, though popular, the breed can be seen in Russian paintings and writings hundreds of years old. This sets them apart from breeds that are the result of fairly recent selective breeding.

There is an increasing interest in Siberians worldwide, and they are currently accepted in all registries.

 

Breed Standard

Description: The Siberian is a medium/large, strong cat which takes 5 years to mature. The females weigh less than the males. They are extremely agile and athletic. Their muscles are mighty, outstanding and powerful. The back is medium and slightly lower in front than in the hind, but appears horizontal when in motion. A barrel shaped, muscular torso, develops with age. The hind legs, when straightened, are slightly longer than the forelegs. The paws are round, big and quite powerful. The overall appearance should be one of great strength and power; the facial expression is quite sweet. The general impression is one of roundness and circles.

 

Coat: This is a moderately long to longhaired cat, with hair on the shoulder blades and lower part of the chest being thick and slightly shorter. Siberians have a triple coat. There should be an abundant ruff setting off the large, impressive head. There is a tight undercoat, thicker in cold weather. Allow for warm weather coats. The hair may thicken to curls on the belly and britches, but a wavy coat is not characteristic. The skin may have a bluish cast. Clear strong colors and patterns are desirable, but are secondary to type.

 

Eyes: The large, almost round eyes are at least one eye width apart with the outer corner slightly angled toward the lower base of the ear. There is no relationship between eye color and coat color/pattern, however, as with all pointed cats the eye color is blue with pointed colors

 

Ears: The ears are medium-large, wide and set as much on the sides of the head as on the top; ideal position is 1 to 1-1/2 ear widths apart. The tips are rounded and the ear tilts forward. Ear furnishings are desirable. Hair over the back of the ears is short and thin; from the middle of the ear, the furnishings become longer and cover the base completely.

 

Tail: The tail is medium length, wide at the base, blunt at the tip without thickening or kinks, evenly and thickly furnished.

 

Head: The head is a modified wedge of medium size with rounded contours, broader at the skull and narrowing slightly to a full rounded muzzle with well-rounded chin. There may be a slight muzzle curvature, but the transition between the side of the head and the muzzle is gentle and inconspicuous. The cheek bones are neither high set nor prominent. There should be a good distance between the ears and eyes. The top of the head is flat, with a gentle nose curvature of a gentle slope from the forehead to the nose and a slight concave curvature before the tip. The neck is medium, rounded, substantial, and very well-muscled, siberians have the appearance of no neck.

Jenna Baltzell

Small Hobby Breeder located in Southern Indiana.

vbsiberiancats@gmail.com

812 . 890 . 5522 

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